Why rebuilding trust in governments is key to end COVID-19

Vaccine hesitancy as a global challenge – Why rebuilding trust in governments is key to end COVID-19

Rejection of the jab from parts of the population remains a challenge for achieving increased immunisation coverage and, consequently, the end of the pandemic. Because vaccine hesitancy is largely driven by lack of trust in governments, rebuilding trust in governments is essential for a successful global vaccination campaign. Trust is an essential attribute of social cohesion and socially cohesive societies are more resilient during crisis. The current one is certainly not the last we will face.

Governing planetary health. On the right to a safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment.

Geopolitics has an important role to play in securing the health of both people and planet. Indeed, businesses cannot be asked to govern the planet’s health if some of the most polluting countries in the world are not on board. Successful governance of planetary health depends on geopolitics and cross border implementation. It also demands that special attention be paid to the interlinkages between businesses, environmental justice and inequalities. All of these are crucial to advance the universal right to a safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment.

The rise of public development banks in the European financial architecture for development

Elcano and ETTG have published the report on the rise of public development banks in the European financial architecture for development which shows how PDBs are critical in promoting resilience to shocks (financial, economic, pandemic, climate, etc.), stabilise the economy and foster a more rapid long-lasting recovery. The report also stresses  the importance of medium- and long-term finance for development that  can help building markets and promoting economic transformation in a  sustainable, green, inclusive and gender-sensitive manner.  

The proof of the haggis: Making sense of the Glasgow climate change conference

In spite of all the anger and frustration that was palpable especially during the final iterations of the Glasgow cover decision, it would be too bleak to consider COP26 as a mere waste of time and effort. Much rather, the Glasgow package delivered a hefty lump for all Parties to chew on. As of now, it remains hard to tell how palatable individual Parties will find their haggis once they take it to their domestic tables. But if they now act even upon the half-hearted words of the Glasgow Climate Pact, the implementation of the Paris Agreement could finally gain traction. Ultimately, the proof of the haggis will be in the eating.

How Can the G20 Support Innovative Mechanisms to Mobilise Financial Resources for LDCs in a Post-Pandemic World?

The covid-19 pandemic has generated severe health, economic and debt crises for the least developed countries (LDCs). On the one hand, they cannot mobilise sufficient financial resources on their own to cope with the effects of the pandemic because their public revenues are too low and external finance is not always available. On the other hand, many LDCs have been highly indebted, even prior to the crisis.

Still on track? The UN Climate Conference has to prove that the Paris Agreement is working

Five years after the Paris Climate Agreement entered into force and one year after the COVID-enforced hiatus, the 26th Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (“COP26”) will convene in the Scottish city of Glasgow on 31 October. At long last! Amongst its most important tasks will be advancing the implementation of the Paris Agreement by resolving the remaining issues surrounding its rules for implementation.