Health crisis and climate emergency: an opportunity to accelerate the diversification of oil companies' activities?

Health crisis and climate emergency: an opportunity to accelerate the diversification of oil companies’ activities?

The years preceding the health crisis linked to the Covid-19 pandemic, marked in particular by the oil counter-shock of 2014 and the signing of the Paris Climate Agreement of 2015, saw the emergence of (weak) signals of diversification of the activity and investment of certain oil companies—essentially the European majors—towards low-carbon energies. While these announcements could have a knock-on effect on the sector, they are still very insufficient in view of the effort required to initiate a rapid and profound transition of the sector towards decarbonisation,2 and are contested by several civil society actors.

Disadvantaged groups in the pandemic. How to respond inclusively to COVID-19 in the interests of the common good

Disadvantaged groups in the pandemic. How to respond inclusively to COVID-19 in the interests of the common good

The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting all of us, but to differing extents. Overstretched health care systems, curfews, unemployment and school closures are posing challenges and pushing people beyond their ability to cope. The consequences of the pandemic will be felt in both, the short and long term. However, the longer term health, economic and social impact can only be estimated at present.

Covid-19 and democracy - Tackling the pandemic without doing away with democracy

Covid-19 and democracy – Tackling the pandemic without doing away with democracy

Governments around the world have restricted basic democratic rights such as freedom of assembly, stepped up state monitoring of citizens, muzzled the media with new laws and arrests, and expanded their own powers as part of their Covid-19 policy. Those making foreign and development policy must monitor this carefully. The Covid-19 pandemic is a catalyst for democracy’s demise.