Putting ‘Policy Coherence for Peace’ at the Heart of the EU’s Approach to External Crises and Conflicts

Putting ‘Policy Coherence for Peace’ at the Heart of the EU’s Approach to External Crises and Conflicts

The adoption of the EU’s Multi-annual Financial Framework (MFF) 2021-2027 will bring profound changes to the set-up of the EU’s instruments for crisis prevention, conflict management and peacebuilding in fragile and conflict-affected countries, which aim to improve the EU’s ability to engage in these contexts. However, reforming the EU’s financial instruments alone is not sufficient to address key underlying challenges. What is needed is an overarching strategic framework that puts policy coherence for sustainable peace at the centre of EU crisis prevention, conflict management and peacebuilding. 

Overcoming Covid-19 and preventing new crises. What role will research play in the “super year” 2021?

Overcoming Covid-19 and preventing new crises. What role will research play in the “super year” 2021?

2020 was dominated by a collective global crisis on an unprecedented scale, the impact of which was felt differently around the globe and in parts of society. And the Covid-19 pandemic will continue to cast its shadow this year. The fight against Covid-19 and the recovery in the economy and society are coming at the same time as several major events in international environmental and climate policy.

COVID-19 in the Arctic. How the EU’s new Arctic policy should take account of the pandemic

COVID-19 in the Arctic. How the EU’s new Arctic policy should take account of the pandemic

“What happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic. It affects us all.”
The EU intends to play a pioneering role in the future, armed with a “clear and coherent Arctic policy”. If this is to succeed, the EU will need to take the lessons learned from the pandemic into account because COVID-19 has exacerbated existing inequalities and challenges in the region, particularly in terms of infrastructure and healthcare.

Pushing people further into poverty: the impact of Covid-19 in lower- and middle- income countries

Pushing people further into poverty: the impact of Covid-19 in lower- and middle- income countries

Many of us are hopeful for a Covid-19 vaccine in the near future to overcome a tumultuous year. But for people living in poverty in lower- and middle-income countries, the crisis is far from over. Vaccinations are potentially still years away for these countries, and many donors have significantly cut their aid budgets. This threatens to reverse hard-fought progress to both lift people out of poverty and improve opportunities for women and girls. It also puts vulnerable groups, such as people with disabilities and migrants, at risk.

Economic Pulse 1: Covid-19 and economic crisis – China’s recovery and international response

Economic Pulse 1: Covid-19 and economic crisis – China’s recovery and international response

This is the first report in ODI’s Economic Pulse series. It explores China’s international economic response to Covid-19 and analyses its international engagements, especially in developing countries, in light of shifts in the global economic and political landscape. Our review of China’s economic response has an international focus due to the nature of the macroeconomic data, while project-level data and a policy review drill down into the effects of that response on developing countries.

ETTG OECD Webinar - Weathering the storm: what role for multilateral development finance in response to the COVID-19 crisis

ETTG webinar event in cooperation with OECD – Weathering the storm: what role for multilateral development finance in response to the COVID-19 crisis

On Thursday 29 of October at 16:00 pm (CET) we hosted a webinar event in cooperation with OECD on multilateral development finance in response to the COVID-19 crisis. The webinar investigated the dynamics of the Multilateral Development Finance framework in the wake of COVID-19, and made concrete recommendations on the most effective and impactful ways forward.

"Pray in Your Homes": Religion and the State in North Africa in Times of COVID-19

“Pray in Your Homes”: Religion and the State in North Africa in Times of COVID-19

COVID-19 has led governments across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to take a number of measures to battle the pandemic. Many of these actions directly related to religious practices such as the cancelation of the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca, closing down mosques and amending the call to prayer from the usual “hayya alas-salah” or “come to prayer” to “salu fi buyutikum” or “pray in your homes”.

Profiteers of the pandemic? COVID-19 has not killed global populism

Profiteers of the pandemic? COVID-19 has not killed global populism

Populism has revealed one of its weaknesses, by displaying particularly ineffective crisis management. However, it is not clear that populism will be politically unsuccessful in the post-corona future. The ability of populists to mobilise supporters, to concentrate powers and to spread a narrative of the crisis aligned with their nationalist and authoritarian ideology should not be underestimated. They could show resilience by relying on a broader anti-globalist narrative, conspiracy theories and polarization.

Tax implications of Covid-19. A fundamental transformation of tax systems is needed in the wake of COVID-19

Tax implications of Covid-19. A fundamental transformation of tax systems is needed in the wake of COVID-19

While the 2008/2009 global economic crisis had many negative consequences, one positive effect was that it massively accelerated international cooperation on tax matters. This is the kind of impetus that we also need for tackling the Covid-19 pandemic. The focus is not on generating more revenues, but rather primarily on achieving greater equity in the way that revenues are generated. This requires more public discussion of fair taxation. After all, the way that resources are mobilised and deployed to tackle the crisis will also have an impact on state legitimacy and social cohesion.