Synthesis note: Strengthening the continent-to-continent dialogue on sustainable development

This synthesis note presents one-page overviews of the main findings and recommendations in relation to the five themes, which are discussed in greater detail in the policy briefs that have been published during the past months. A link to the full policy brief is included at the end of each one-pager. These thematic overviews are preceded by a short analysis of the relationship between Africa and Europe and five proposals for strengthening the continent-to-continent dialogue on sustainable development.

Towards a renewed Africa-Europe Partnership for Investment

The COVID-19 crisis has created a dire need for the active facilitation of sustainable investment to promote an inclusive, gender-sensitive and green recovery. The partnership between the European Union (EU) and the African Union (AU), and their respective member states, can provide a strategic and institutional framework for stimulating sustainable investment in a collective manner.

Europe, Africa and digital sovereignty

Europe and Africa should make joint efforts to invest in projects that would support digital sovereignty on both continents, including joint industrial projects – in the area of ethical AI and open-source technologies for instance. This would respond to some of the gaps in terms of local digital industries on both continents as well as to local needs, and would demonstrate that the EU-AU digital partnership is not simply about trying to export European technologies or about aid, but about reinforcing a free and open internet.

Towards a policy consensus: New partnership to focus on the future of Africa-Europe relations

Towards a policy consensus: New partnership to focus on the future of Africa-Europe relations

A joint press release about the recent cooperation with United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Institute for Security Studies (ISS) and our Network on a series of high-level, closed doors virtual expert seminars for the AU-EU partnership.

COVID-19 In-depth Analysis: Continuity and Change in European Union-Africa Relations on Peace and Security

Continuity and Change in European Union-Africa Relations on Peace and Security

The European Union (EU) and the African Union (AU) maintain a long-standing partnership on peace and security which can be qualified as constructive. It is largely based on joint interests and objectives and is less contentious compared to other more challenging topics, such as migration and trade. The EU’s new seven-year budget for 2021 – 2027 introduces new ways of working which impact on how the EU will engage on peace and security in Africa. Most notable in this regard is the establishment of the European Peace Facility (EPF) which can potentially undermine the AU’s role in leading and coordinating peace and security measures on the continent. Moreover, these new developments take place against the backdrop of an overall troubled EU-AU relationship which suffers not only from the divergences in interests in key areas such as migration, trade and climate but also from the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, and global geopolitics.

A new multilateralism for the post-COVID world: What role for the EU-Africa partnership?

Multilateralism has been in trouble for a while, particularly​ ​at the global level. Yet, the European Union (EU) and its​ ​member states have remained among its staunchest​ ​supporters.​I​n their June 2019 Council Conclusions, EU​ ​leaders drew the outlines of a common European vision to​ ​uphold, extend and reform the multilateral system. Against​ ​an increasingly complex and contested geopolitical​ ​backdrop, these goals were further developed in the​ ​recent EU Communication on Multilateralism, published in​ ​February 2021.