Supporting developing countries for a global sustainable recovery: lessons from the Italian G20 Presidency

A series of high-profile events has added up to making 2021 a crucial year to tackle the global sustainable development agenda and present a unique opportunity to drive a virtuous circle of political commitment, regulation, and financial flows towards sustainable recovery in developing countries, which is a key issue of this year’s G20 cycle. Bringing the voice of developing countries in the global multilateral agenda is not easy to tackle due to different and often competing political priorities. This blog draws lessons from the Italian G20 Presidency to inform the development policy considerations and efforts of the upcoming Indonesian, Indian and Brazilian G20 Presidencies. These Presidencies have a great potential to prioritize sustainable recovery in the Global South in their own, as well as in cooperation with the G7 and EU Presidencies when appropriate.

Supporting the Global South in tackling climate change: where is the G20 heading?

A recent IAI study has argued that several shortcomings in the climate and development finance systems undermine the capacity of countries in the Global South to tackle climate change¹. Insufficient resources, lack of focus on adaptation, inadequate management of climate risks, the vicious circle between indebtedness and climate vulnerability are some of the major obstacles.

Taking off multilaterally: Germany’s next federal government and the United Nations

Will Germany’s next federal government take UN’s proposal for launching a new phase of global common good promotion as an opportunity to increase the strategic value and coherence of German UN policy? How will be Germany’s post COVID-19 contribution to the multilateral world?

Development cooperation during the pandemic How COVID-19 is highlighting the benefits of a localisation of development cooperation

Development cooperation during the pandemic How COVID-19 is highlighting the benefits of a localisation of development cooperation

The discussion about the benefits of this localisation, usually conducted in the development cooperation community under the heading of “participation”, has been especially intensive in the area of humanitarian aid in recent years. “Localisation” refers to the process of international organisations handing over more decision-making power and resources to local stakeholders.

ETTG paper DIE/ECDPM/ACET - Green Transitions in Africa–Europe relations: What role for the European Green Deal?

Green Transitions in Africa–Europe relations: What role for the European Green Deal?

Europe–Africa relations are facing a double challenge – the COVID-19 pandemic puts social and economic systems under strain at a point when the consequences of the climate crisis are being increasingly felt on both continents. Within Africa and Europe, debates have started about recovery measures to address the pandemic’s short and medium-term socio-economic consequences. A key question in these debates is how to “build back better” and use the crisis to promote green transitions and move towards more sustainable development pathways.

COVID-19 In-depth Analysis: Continuity and Change in European Union-Africa Relations on Peace and Security

Continuity and Change in European Union-Africa Relations on Peace and Security

The European Union (EU) and the African Union (AU) maintain a long-standing partnership on peace and security which can be qualified as constructive. It is largely based on joint interests and objectives and is less contentious compared to other more challenging topics, such as migration and trade. The EU’s new seven-year budget for 2021 – 2027 introduces new ways of working which impact on how the EU will engage on peace and security in Africa. Most notable in this regard is the establishment of the European Peace Facility (EPF) which can potentially undermine the AU’s role in leading and coordinating peace and security measures on the continent. Moreover, these new developments take place against the backdrop of an overall troubled EU-AU relationship which suffers not only from the divergences in interests in key areas such as migration, trade and climate but also from the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, and global geopolitics.

A new multilateralism for the post-COVID world: What role for the EU-Africa partnership?

Multilateralism has been in trouble for a while, particularly​ ​at the global level. Yet, the European Union (EU) and its​ ​member states have remained among its staunchest​ ​supporters.​I​n their June 2019 Council Conclusions, EU​ ​leaders drew the outlines of a common European vision to​ ​uphold, extend and reform the multilateral system. Against​ ​an increasingly complex and contested geopolitical​ ​backdrop, these goals were further developed in the​ ​recent EU Communication on Multilateralism, published in​ ​February 2021.